I seldom use an eraser

Charcoal-Drawing-Trops

I seldom use an eraser, and when I do use one, it is at the very end of the drawing session, sometimes even a few days later.  The reason for this is, I believe a mark laid is a mark played.  The essence of the expression is intact and pure, the lineage of senses and expression maintained.  The lack of eraser forces me to be efficient and clean and direct.  It is about the honesty of mark making in my practice.

Before the eraser … (please excuse the colour differences, as this one was taken by my iphone during drawing session, and the lights were dim. Interestingly, the colour is more correct in this image than the second image.)

Charcoal Drawing Trops
Before- Charcoal Drawing Julia Trops

And after the eraser …

Charcoal-Drawing-Trops
After – Charcoal drawing Julia Trops

The editing is slight, and only because I felt that the drawing was telling me to do it. Sounds strange if you aren’t an artist yourself, but my fellow artists will know exactly what I am talking about. The editing was done three days after drawing session was finished. This work and others are available for sale in my online gallery. This link will open a new window.

Gold leafing workshop at Opus March 22, 10 am to noon

Gold leaf oil pen original artwork julia trops

I am once again making an appearance at Opus on Saturday March 22, 10 to noon.  This time I will be discussing gold leafing and mixed media.  The Opus staff did a far better job of doing the write up, so I will just copy and paste what they have on their website.

http://opusartsupplies.com/how/demos/gold-leafing-and-mixed-media (will open popup)

Anyway, here is the write up.

Location:  Kelowna
Date: Saturday March 22 2014, 10 to noon

Note – March 5, 2014: This demonstration is now full and no further registration will be taken. Thank you for your interest!

Gold Leafing can add a unique and engaging element to mixed media works. Julia will be demonstrating the water gilding gold leafing process on both paper and wood panel, getting them ready as surfaces on which to paint and draw.

Using a variety of art materials, from pens and markers to acrylic and oil paints and mediums, Julia will demonstrate each step of the mixed media process through a number of works in progress.

Space is limited to 30 attendees and registration is required.

Gold leaf mixed media painting on mounted panel Julia Trops
Gold leaf mixed media painting on mounted panel 6×6

Charcoal and Pastel Drawings – 2014

Charcoal Pastel Drawing

Some people are automatic writers; I’m an automatic drawer.  I respond with mark making, and it doesn’t always look like what I see.  I’ve had clients and friends telling me they see faces and people and angels in my work, and I never really looked until this weekend.  There’s quite a few in this one.  I’m not sure where they are coming from.  This is actually a female figurative nude based on magnificent model Donnalee, 12×16 watercolour paper.

Charcoal Pastel Drawing Julia Trops
Faces in the crowd Charcoal & Pastel by Julia Trops

Ryan Robson’s Lady-like exhibit at the College – my take

Recently, a number of people asked me to comment on Ryan Robson’s “Lady-Like” exhibit and what happened in those subsequent weeks.  I’ve taken some time to think about the events and the subject and for what it is worth, here are my thoughts.

If you aren’t familiar with it, the story is documented here:

http://www.vernonmorningstar.com/news/240912791.html

and here:

http://infotel.ca/newsitem/Controversial-art-exhibit-stripped-from-Okanagan-College/IT7297

and here on CBC is the interview with Ryan about the show (7 minutes long):

http://www.cbc.ca/player/Radio/Local+Shows/British+Columbia/ID/2430385542/

From the infotel.ca link:

“After receiving a number of concerns, we thought the time frame for this exhibit maybe should be left at two weeks. During that time almost all of our college community would have had time to experience the art,” Lister says.

So here are the facts as I see them:

  • Ryan Robson is a local Vernon artist.
  • Gallery Vertigo, an artist run gallery, has an agreement with the Kalamalka Okanagan College satellite campus in Vernon to have artworks on display for one month, so by my math, that is four weeks.
  • There was no financial cost to display the art.
  • Robson creates sincere and genuine works with the intention of helping herself, and helping others by opening a dialogue on a very distressing and confrontational subject.
  • The artworks are on display for a very, very short period of time (days?) before complaints come in to the Okanagan College administrators.
  • The artworks are no longer able to be up for the agreed amount time with the administrator citing the “complaints”.

Based on the actions of the administrators of Kalamalka – Okanagan College, my take is the following:

  • The Okanagan College failed in its role as a centre for expanded learning.
  • They don’t understand the value of art as a vehicle for education and understanding, compassion and empathy.
  • They see art as “conditional” rather than a “necessary”.
  • They should have stood up to the complainers and stood up for the art.
  • I believe that as long as the art is landscapes and flowers and fairies or objective abstracts then art is welcome on their walls.
  • Ryan Robson is a local artist.
  • Local artists are not taken seriously or their genuine work is seen as valid.
  • If this was an outside exhibit that they had to pay to display then the artworks would have been up for the agreed amount of time.

The College had an opportunity to expand consciousness and understanding of such a highly charged area of human life, and I am certain sexual molestation happens to more children and people than we know.  I am sure they could have taken advantage of this artist’s sharing by having her come and speak to the psychology classes, or other subjects they teach.  Speaking from the experience of someone who is coming to terms with my own identity and exploring the same in my work, the actions of the College are reprehensible considering that this area purports itself to be so culturally aware.

Instead, they shut her down and gave the message “we don’t want to see that”, or “we don’t care about what you went through, it isn’t valid art”. Regardless of what was said, actions speak louder than words, and that was the message, very clear to all.  And again, I think it is because she was a local artist.  If this was an artist from Toronto, or Vancouver, or if they had to pay for the exhibit, then this outcome would be very different.

Too bad the College succumbed to squeaky wheels and whiners instead of telling them to stuff it.  They could have made themselves the example of strength and leadership by standing up for the principle and needs of art.

But they didn’t.

 

 

New online art gallery and shop

After so many years on Ruby Lane, I have opened up my own art gallery online at http://www.juliatropsart.com.  It’s really new, less than a month old, and the works from the residencies in Italy and Spain are available here.  Because I am so prolific, it did not make financial sense to keep paying the fees on Ruby Lane, but I will keep that art gallery open for a little while longer, probably til the end of the year, or to mid 2014.

During the transition, send me a note if you are looking for a specific artwork and can not find it.

Payment can still be done the regular way, online through paypal or if you want to call me with payment information, I am set up for that as well.  Any questions, by all means, let me know.

Thank you for your interest in my work!

The Butterfly Effect – A Day for Hospice

To see the full work in progress, please visit the album on my Facebook page:

July-21-Hospice-Event at the Lavender Farm in Kelowna Julia Trops Peacock
The start of the Peacock for the Lavender Farm Butterfly Effect Hospice Fundraiser. Of the two stones, I used the one on the right.
Julia Trops Peacock Stone Lavender Farm Fundraiser Hospice Okanagan
Work in progress. Photograph by Patrick Wilkins from Organic Studios https://www.facebook.com/pages/Organic-Studios. You can kinda see my eyes.
Julia Trops, brazilian soapstone, sculpture, lavender farm, hospice association
The rock itself sits in front of the plant, and the plant itself is alive, so it gets a new plant every year. Can be moved around, etc.
Julia Trops, brazilian soapstone, sculpture, lavender farm, hospice association
Copper feathers to place in the plant, complete with the eye…
Peacock Julia Trops Lavender Farm Hospice Fundraiser
The peacock went for $500 I was told. I think he looks great! Thank you to Annabel for sending the pics, done by Kirstin Wakal

Gallery Odin Artists support Vernon Jubilee Hospital at Summer Wine Festival

20130811-191621.jpg

The artists in Gallery Odin , Julia Trops, Destanne Norris, Glen Clarke, Elizabeth Moore, Wendy Hart-Penner and Barry Rafuse worked on August 9th and 10th for the Summer Wine Festival creating works that would be later auctioned off in support if the Vernon Jubilee Hospital. Because of the generosity of the bidders who knew how a fundraiser works, bid high and often. This almost madero believe in silent auctions again! Thank you from the bottom of my heart to Donna L who won my piece by the actions of a truly a generous heart. This was well appreciated.

Artwork Donation Julia Trops Vernon Jubilee Hospital Gallery Odin Silver Star Ski Resort
My donation for the fundraiser, The Bouquet, 6×12, Acrylic. Based on the trees just outside the village of Silver Star Ski Resort

 

How long did it take you to do that?

There is a story about Picasso and a napkin.  Some say it was a man who asked for the drawing on the napkin and some say it was a woman. Some say it was a park, others say it was a cafe.  I have no doubt one of these is true, and I have no doubt that this actually occurred. Regardless, the remainder of the story is the same: Picasso whipped out a pen and banged out a sketch, handed it to the person, and said, “One million dollars, please.”

“A million dollars?” the person exclaimed. “That only took you thirty seconds!”

“Yes,” said Picasso. “But it took me fifty years to learn how to draw that in thirty seconds.”

Can Serrat Artist Residency

Biography:

Since moving to Kelowna in 2002, Julia Trops has taught drawing, trained life drawing models, and was the sole founding organizer of the weekly Life Drawing sessions at the Rotary Centre for the Arts. These sessions began the development of the non profit life drawing group, incorporated two years later in 2005 as Livessence Society of Figurative Artists and Models. Heavily involved in the arts community, a Kelowna Museums board director for the past seven years, a founder of Okanagan Erotic Art Show, co-founder of Okanagan Arts Awards (as part of the Arts Council of the Central Okanagan). Encouraging other artists to get their name in print, 2009 onwards, Julia has compiled the Okanagan Erotic Art Show Catalog and the Simplicity in Mind for Livessence. In 2011, Julia was shortlisted for the City of Kelowna’s Honour in the Arts.

Julia keeps pretty busy in her studio, having sold over 1000 works worldwide since 2004 and shows at Gallery Odin at Silver Star Mountain Ski Resort.

Julia Trops at Can Serrat
photo by Nancy Hendrickson

Statement: I came to Can Serrat without any constraints or preconceived ideas about the direction my work would take. I was looking forward to letting inspiration guide the expression. Montserrat became the primary source of ideas pertaining to place and identity.

Montserrat's Village Acrylic Painting on canvas, 80x40 Julia Trops

The mountain is ever changing. Standing tall in the landscape, unashamedly evolving, dissolving, renewing and creating, it is made of disparate materials, conglomerate rocks. It is a refuge and a home for many animals, including man. It reaches to the sky, tantalizing climbers. It´s a tower of babel, a place of many languages, all striving to be understood. Rock climbers and pilgrims alike find a sense of self within the landscape, one of the human spirit and the earth mother, an answer to “where am I, who am I,” and a sense of relevance to the world.

The colours, bold reds and blues are the same palette I am known for at home in Canada. Though until now my work has been dominated by the human form, here it is the naturally occurring figures in the mountain that inspire me. Having completed some works, and named them, it came as a surprise and yet not really a surprise, that the mountain peaks actually have names. There are “Monks”, “Angels”, and even “a Giant”.

Can Serrat artworks Julia Trops

My process is tactile. I paint with my hands, – I like the immediacy, the intimacy, the direct contact with paint, feeling it between my fingers, seeing each stroke on the canvas, shaping with light and colour. I layer colour upon colour, creating vibrations and relationships, some jarring and some in harmony, just like human interactions.

One day I was so full of the mountain, I had to recreate it in stones that I found along the path to Vinya Nova,(a beautiful restaurant snug at the base of the mountain). This piece is an assemblage of slate and quartzite mounted on tile from the nearby tile factory, which I also passed along the way. I called it Little Montserrat and is about 24 inches long by 8 inches high.

Little Montserrat Graphite and Slate mounted on Tile Julia Trops
Little Montserrat Graphite and Slate mounted on Tile

Like other mountain ranges, created from the clashing of tectonic plates, Montserrat symbolizes strength over adversity, the subconscious brought to the surface, the recognition of buried treasures, brought in to the warm friendship of the Catalan sun, shaped by the whipping criticism of the wind and the gentle pressing of falling rain.

For all the artwork from this residency, here is the album: https://plus.google.com/photos/117793035582351565246/albums/5868974012334970321

The journey continues.