Artists, things to think about when writing your artist biography

3 types of artist biographies:

  1. Make it short and snappy, a one liner that you can throw out there to give a quick snapshot but that will generate interest – this is especially useful as a meta description for your artist biography web page.
  2. One paragraph that you can use in promo and print, and
  3. Two or three paragraphs that you can use when submitting articles, artworks, or where you need something that tells a little bit of your life story.

Any longer than two or three paragraphs, and you might as well write a book.

Things to consider in your bio – first and most important, it is most commonly written in third person. Make a list of facts, such as given below, and then ask a friend to write it for you.

Your name (of course! it is good SEO practice to put your name in anything that you do – just once in a one-liner, one time for your full name in the single para, and once or twice maximum in the two or three paras. In the two or three paragraph bio, say your full name (ie Julia Trops) and then refer to yourself as either Julia or Trops, not both.

Where you are or where you are from – ie Julia Trops is a Canadian painter/sculptor living in Kelowna BC, who focuses on female nude form.

What – what are you doing? are you a painter? sculptor? is your nationality important to you? For me, it is because I am proud to be a Canadian, and served in the air force for 12 years.

In the longer biographies, include your influences, what makes you do what you do, what are your interests, your passion… you may also include where you are going….

And so forth – here is my one paragraph bio –

Just like any other artist, I’ve always drawn – I can’t remember a day when I haven’t. Music and song have been my escape, and dance has been a passion even though I sound like a crow and am completely uncoordinated. In my mind, I sing and dance perfectly! I was encouraged from a very young age to “see” and be “aware” in more ways than the visual. Immediately after high school I took courses in the University of Calgary Fine Arts’ program. I continued studies at a post secondary level throughout my 12 year career in the Canadian Air Force, in both correspondence and night school. One of my ultimate goals was finally reached when I attended a full time degree program at University of Lethbridge, receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Great Distinction in 2001. In 2002, in competition with 78 other candidates, I was chosen to be one of 6 resident artists in the new Rotary Centre for the Arts. I am still there now (it is 2009).

And my full page artist biography (taken from my website) – as you can see, the last two paragraphs have incorporated a mini artist statement as well….

Just like any other artist, I’ve always drawn – I can’t remember a day when I haven’t. Music and song have been my escape, and dance has been a passion even though I sound like a crow and am completely uncoordinated. In my mind, I sing and dance perfectly!

I was encouraged from a very young age to:see” and be “aware” in more ways than the visual. Immediately after high school I took courses in the University of Calgary Fine Arts’ program. I continued studies at a post secondary level throughout my 12 year career in the Canadian Air Force, in both correspondence and night school. One of my ultimate goals was finally reached when I attended a full time degree program at University of Lethbridge, receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Great Distinction in 2001.

In 2002, in competition with 78 other candidates, I was chosen to be one of 6 resident artists in the new Rotary Centre for the Arts. I am still there now (it is 2009).

Among the historical art influences on my work are the Greek classical, da Vinci, Rembrandt, Ingres, Delacroix, Manet, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Matisse, Picasso, Tapies, and most recently, Klee and Kandinsky. Influences from art theory include John Berger, Josef Albers, from theosophy include Leadbetter and Blavatsky, Fritjof Capra and currently Joseph Campbell.

I am most completely enraptured with the essence of the female symbol as described through comparative mythology. Each culture of the world integrates the female symbol in many similar ways. Ultimately, the symbol of creative spirit in all her forms – both creative and destructive, erotic and matronly (and who says these are not interchangeable?) is the female form.

These interests, which are currently manifesting in my expression, consist of a combination of concepts from time, space, and music. How I approach my art making is a result of my experiences in my previous career, and my desire for simple, direct and passionate expression.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *